DIY Fall Wine Bottle Decor – Perfect for any season!

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So before I get too ahead of myself with incessant posts about baby P’s first birthday and DIY Halloween decor I just wanted to share this little tid bit of my fall decor that I whipped up using things I always have on hand – wine bottles and scrap fabric 🙂 Now as I do on at least one day most weeks, I found myself in the fabric store buying the fall themed burlap for my DIY Autumn Pennant Banner and happened to walk past their display of little seasonal over-priced chochkies (is that how you spell that word? lol) and saw a cute little decorated wine bottle. As I do with most of the fabric store ready-made decor I passed since I was not about to pay $12.99 for a bottle (a small one at that, if it had actually contained wine at any point I feel bad for the person who emptied it – they got jipped! lol) wrapped in twine, however I did snap a picture and make a mental must-DIY-that note.

Before I get to the tutorial I think it’s worth mentioning that as I fulfill my holiday decorating goal of keeping my home decor themed with each holiday, I’m realizing the fact that Halloween falls right in the middle of the start of fall and Thanksgiving really messes with decor in that I came up with a whole bunch of autumn-y type ideas for our home only to remember that I would have to put up Halloween pieces and then pull the fall stuff out again for the whole harvest/autumn theme that goes along with Thanksgiving. Super complicated stuff this decorating business is, lol! Anyway, before I figured out that I would wind up in a decorating pickle, I decided to re-create the little wine bottle craft that I saw in the fabric store the week before only I would go a step further and create a set of four! Two things I love about this project: first, it is super easy and cheap to create and while I know wine isn’t free but lets be real, wine bottles are plentiful at the Schulze home, lol. Second, since there are four bottles and the embellishments are interchangeable I can easily swap out the wording for any holiday for instance, “noel” for Christmas, “love” for Valentine’s Day, “booo” for Halloween and so on. This can be made with any scrap fabric if you have a particular color scheme in mind or want it to fit the theme of a particular room instead of a holiday that would work too!

my inspiration!

my inspiration!

my version :)

my version 🙂

SUPPLIES

*this supply list is for my specific creation, any scrap fabric combinations can be used!

  • 4 wine bottles, labels removed
  • scrap burlap (plain and printed)
  • scrap lace
  • scrap fall print fabric
  • twine
  • gold ribbon
  • faux fall leaves
  • crafting letters or stencils
  • orange acrylic paint
  • hot glue/glue gun

DIRECTIONS

Step 1: I began by removing the labels from my wine bottles by soaking them in some warm soapy water then scrubbing off with a sponge. Since I drink relatively cheap wine the labels remove pretty easily but if yours are a little more stubborn Goo-Gone will take them right off.

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Step 2: I then cut my strips of plain burlap and lace and secured them around each of the wine bottles using a few dots of hot glue.

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my lace was actually cut from a pair of curtains that I found at a thrift store for $0.50!

my lace was actually cut from a pair of curtains that I found at a thrift store for $0.50!

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Step 3: Next I prepared my “fall” portion of the decor by cutting four small squares of fall themed fabric and then four smaller squares of printed burlap to be glued atop the first squares. Next took my faux fall leaves (purchased at Walmart for $0.98 for a package of about 12!) and used a dot of hot glue to attach two to each fabric square.

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98 cent Walmart leaves!

98 cent Walmart leaves!

Step 4: At this point I took my craft letters left over from another project and painted them orange (they were originally brown but I felt that the orange stuck out better, at this point you can also stencil the wording directly onto your fabric squares using acrylic paint). Once they had dried I glued each to the front of my fabric squares. To attach the square to the bottles I cut two small holes in the top of each of the fabric piece and ran a piece of twine through each and tied them around the body of the wine bottles. Finally I tied a decorative ribbon bow atop each of the bottle necks – done!

finished product :)

finished product 🙂

Pottery Barn Hack – DIY Faux Succulent Wreath

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So I have a confession to make, despite the awesomeness that is this wreath, until I made it I hadn’t gotten swept up in the whole succulent craze. This is probably because anything that becomes popular automatically becomes unnecessarily expensive, even fake plants, lol. Come to think of it, back in the day I knew succulents as “rubber plants” and my parents would lure us to the Home Depot with the promise of being able to buy a little rubber plant or cactus if we cooperated (don’t worry, since then I’ve learned to extort better items from my parents in exchange for favors, lol), haha. Anyway, back to the wreath. J’s sweet Aunt M asked if I would be able to make her a wreath and sent me a picture of a Pottery Barn faux succulent wreath (pictured below) and went on to explain that since the wreath would not be under the shelter of a porch or storm door it would need to be made of materials that would withstand the elements and this one seemed to be fitting. I was super intrigued as I hadn’t attempted a faux flower or moss wreath before and couldn’t wait to get started. Well, in typical Natasha fashion I got caught up in approximately one million other projects (worst niece ever! lol) but the other night I was determined to get both this succulent wreath and my own September wreath  done and did so in just a about two hours (which makes it all the more embarrassing that it took so long for me to start, ha)! The wreath turned out beautifully and is made even more attractive by the fact that the cost came in at around $50.00 while the PB version was $99.00! I was almost sad that I wouldn’t get to keep it for myself, lol, but I am happy to know that it will have a good home being enjoyed by J’s Godparents 🙂 I also think that it is worth mentioning that this is one of the most simple wreaths I have made although it looks the most complicated, all it requires is a wreath frame, some Spanish moss and artificial succulents so please don’t let the illusion of complexity be off-putting to you!

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Pottery Barn inspiration! No offense to PB but so not worth $100!

SUPPLIES:

  • 18″ grape vine wreath frame
  • 14 artificial succulents (there are SO many out there, I just picked mine based on the PB version to achieve a similar look)
  • Spanish Moss
  • Glue Gun/Hot Glue
  • Wired Burlap Ribbon or Ready-Made Bow
  • 1 Pipe Cleaner

INSTRUCTIONS:

Step 1: I began by laying out my my wreath components: the faux succulents, the moss and the bow. I messed around with the arrangement and grouping of the succulents and moss to see what looked best. I made sure that wherever I wanted to place the succulents their stems could be wedged between the vines and that they would lay flat as possible against the wreath frame.

Step 2: Once I was happy with the layout of my wreath I used hot glue to attach each succulent one by one by covering the stem and bottom of the succulent with a generous amount of glue and wedging it back between the vines and pressing down firmly. For each moss section I would cover the area atop the wreath frame on which the moss was to be attached with a generous amount of hot glue and gently press the moss on. NOTE: When handling the moss and separating your packaging try to tear it apart as little as possible aside from separating it into sections. To get it to cover the area you need gently stretch it.

Step 3: I worked in the above manner until all of my moss and succulents were attached, the long stringy succulents I secured by applying a little glue to the top of the moss or frame where the long strands would lay and attached them that way. Finally I attached my bow using an olive green pipe cleaner, that way if Aunt M chooses she can switch out the bow at her will!

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Obviously there are tons of variations on this wreath, there are so many varieties of faux succulents and they can be arranged in any manner. If you don’t want the trouble of having to use moss you can purchase a wreath that has been pre-covered in moss (although this may run you a bit more price-wise). I will report back to let you know how this wreath withstood the PA fall and winter, however, my DIY Felt Flower Wreath made using the same frame held up nicely without shelter so hopefully this one is equally as resilient!

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DIY Fabric Covered Photo Mat – Made from a Cereal Box!!!

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Who doesn’t love free stuff? I actually have quite a few “free” projects in the works currently that I’m super excited about, but for now I’ll share this one with you as it was part of our gallery wall which I will reveal soon! This project actually happened by accident when I realized that the frame I was using wasn’t a standard photo frame and I was going to need to cut a photo mat to fit it. Since the piece of art (I shouldn’t say art, it was a weird picture of a cat or something, lol) that was originally in the frame had an ivory mat around it I was going to have J cut it to fit using a box cutter. Of course he misunderstood me (anybody else have an issue with their men having selective hearing when it comes to their crafting requests? lol) and cut the wrong part of the mat, rendering the part I needed useless. Boo-hoo! It was time to come up with a plan B, which I thought would be just to buy and cut a standard mat to size but then I realized that a standard mat wouldn’t fit this frame either (gahh!). Just as I was getting super frustrated and about to ax the use of that particular frame altogether, I remembered that I had seen a picture mat that somebody had covered in fabric by simply mod podging fabric onto a plain picture mat. Now, that still didn’t solve my problem of not having the right mat size, but if I thought that if I could only find a thin cardboard to fashion my own mat I could take advantage of my left over fabric from past projects. I knew that a poster board cut to size would work just fine but in the interest of not having to traipse into town to get one I thought to myself “what do I have in the house that is of similar thickness/material to a poster board?” and then it came to me – a cereal box!!! About a half hour and a little mod podge later I had myself another fancy photo mat (check out my first DIY photo mat here) that not only matched the fabric on our side-light window panels but was free!!! All it required was a little thinking outside of the “box”, so to speak (get it? cereal box, ha.ha.ha). I hope this inspires a free photo mat on your end (you need not use a cereal box like I did, any thin cardboard will do) and should you not have the need for a photo mat right now, keep this one in mind as a great DIY gift opportunity come the holidays!

I'll have plenty of more frame projects in the works if I keep catching more adorable moments like this! These two melt my heart <3

I’ll have plenty of more frame projects in the works if I keep catching more adorable moments like this! These two melt my heart ❤

 

DIY FABRIC PHOTO MAT

SUPPLIES:

  • 1 large cereal box or poster board of some sort
  • fabric of your choice
  • mod podge (I used matte finish but it doesn’t matter what you use)
  • glue gun & hot glue
  • foam brush
  • measuring tape
  • scissors

INSTRUCTIONS:

Step 1: If you are using a cereal box break the box down by cutting along one of the corners so that it can lay flat like a piece of cardboard. Then measure and cut four strips of equal length or four pieces that can come together to form a rectangular mat since it wont matter what your pieces look like beneath the fabric as long as the shape of the mat is even (depending on the size of your box you may not be able to get four equal pieces but rather four pieces just long enough to overlap and connect to form a rectangle). If using a poster board simply measure and draw out your mat and then cut it out already formed.

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My cereal box! In the interest of pinching our pennies I opt for “crisp rice” instead of rice krispies haha

Step 2: Once you have your four pieces connect them so that your print side (if using a cereal box) is all facing one direction using hot glue to form the mat. Ignore this step if you have used a poster board and your mat is ready to go. Now you are ready to measure and add your fabric!

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ensuring that it fits in the frame

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Step 3:  Measure your fabric by laying the fabric print side down (upside down) and laying your mat on top, use a pencil or pen to mark an area just a tad bit larger than your mat size or enough to be folded over the edges (I will explain in the subsequent steps). Once you have marked your rectangle on the fabric, cut it out using your scissors (this should be obvious but keep the rectangle in tact! To cut the center simply puncture a hole in the center of your fabric and cut along the insides).

Step 4: Place your mat so that the non-print side is facing up and lay your fabric cut out over the mat to make sure that it will line up correctly. In each of the inner and outer corners cut a small slit that extends from the edge of the fabric to the corner of the mat (this is so your fabric can be tucked underneath without puckering at the corners).

Step 5: Now you are ready to attach the fabric to the mat. Using your foam brush, brush a generous amount of mod podge onto the mat surface and then lay your fabric atop it and press down to secure. Some mod podge will likely seep through the fabric, this is fine, simply use your foam brush to brush it off so that it doesn’t form clumps. At this point your fabric will still be larger than necessary for the mat but allow it to dry this way before moving onto the next step.

Step 6: Once your fabric has dried for the most part, turn your mat upside down and use hot glue to attach your fabric’s edges to the underneath of the mat, making sure to pull it tightly so that isn’t loose along the edges and holds to the mat securely.

Step 7: Now turn your mat back over and add another coat of mod podge to the top of the fabric, ensuring that you are adding and even layer and are not allowing it to pool or clump along the top. Allow it to dry and you are ready to use it in your frame!!! Ta-da!!! 

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My DIY frame displayed on our gallery wall!

 

To see more of our family pictures from baby P’s 6 month photo session see this post!